more thoughts on moneyless

I have a feeling that my last post (a moneyless lifestyle) may have been misunderstood by a few people, and I’m pretty sure that it probably make more than a few friends and family members a little nervous (or grossed-out… composting poo?  Seriously?!)

When I wrote that, it was on the emotional tail end of a bunch of things that my eyes have been opened to, lately… the ways that I’ve always viewed money, the ways I’ve taken it for granted and the ways I’ve played into an economic system without ever really seeing what it was.

Mark Boyle has a lot of interesting things to say about a moneyless economy, for sure.  But not everything he has to say are things I agree with, and his is not really a book I would recommend that everyone (or even anyone I know) should read.  God used it in my life in a profound way, but unlike Mark, I don’t have any desire to live a completely “moneyless lifestyle.” We’ll charge for goods and services when we feel led to do so, and give things away as we feel led.  Even if we’re someday able to go completely “off-grid,” we’ll probably always spend money on things like music lessons.

But, as I mentioned in my last post, I look around at all the things Jon and I spend money on, I’m horrified to realize the things my husband is trading hours upon hours of his life for.  Netflix?  Totally worth it.  Flushing toilets?  Not so much.

In all seriousness, the point of what I wrote wasn’t to say that we’re going to go find a cave in the woods to live in, but it WAS to say that I’m ready to start trying new things.  Maybe we’ll never have a composting toilet, but why not collect gray water or rain water that can’t be used for other things, instead of polluting drinking water?  Why not make our own shoes or sew our own clothing?  Why not grow our own fruits and vegetables, milk our own animals and make our own cheese?

I’m not advocating or seeking a moneyless lifestyle (despite the ill-thought-out title of my last post.)  But I do feel like I’m seeing things a bit more clearly, and becoming much more willing to step outside of the box and take responsibility for things I’ve been all to happy to let other people be responsible for in my life.

Maybe we’ll never live off-grid in an earth ship surrounded by food forests, but we’ll at least take a little bit more responsibility for our food, water, clothing, etc.  As long as I have access to wi-fi, I’m game for just about anything!

.

PS.  I also need to publish a correction, because apparently I quoted my friend Patrick wrong in my last post when I said that “success was eliminating our need for money.”  What he’d actually said was (something along the lines of): “success (whatever that is) isn’t dependent on a continual flow of money.”  Sorry, Patrick!

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3 Responses to more thoughts on moneyless

  1. Pingback: A Moneyless (or less-money) Lifestyle | Rina Marie

  2. mommatango says:

    Just want to say, we have a really nice composting toilet that we bought when we were living in our camper for a while and it’s totally not gross! 😉 I’m all for finding ways to reduce, reuse and recycle because it truly can free up resources for other, more meaningful, things. I’m not great at it yet but, I’m learning. My husband has to work to pay our mortgage, insurance, etc… but if we can reduce power use, grow more food and be more resourceful, I still think we’d benefit in big way over time. Good thoughts. Glad I found your blog.

    • Rina says:

      I’ve heard a lot of good things about them, but I think any composting I did from them would have to be relegated to the NON edibles in the garden. 🙂 I’m also not so sure about composting toilets with seven kids… that’s a LOT of sawdust and a lot of bucket changes! But I know there are all different types and it’s definitely something I’m interested in exploring!

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